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Table 3 Antibiotic Resistance Among Staphylococcus aureus Isolated from skin and soft tissue infections (SSTIs) in the emergency department

From: All purulence is local – epidemiology and management of skin and soft tissue infections in three urban emergency departments

  MSSA MRSA
  ED Samples (n = 76; 56 Adult) Antibiogram (n = 619) ED Samples (n = 101; 70 Adult) Antibiogram (n = 473)
Drug Pediatric% resistant Adult% resistant Total% resistant Pediatric% resistant Adult% resistant Total% resistant
Ciprofloxacin 0% 2.9% 14% 19.3% 24.5% 61%
Clindamycin 0% 14.7 NR 9.7% 4.1% NR
Erythromycin 28.6% 41.2% 39% 87.1% 100% 92%
Gentamicin 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 1%
Levofloxacin 0% 2.9% 13% 19.3% 22.5% 60%
Moxifloxacin 0% 2.94% NR NR NR NR
Oxacillina 0% 0% 0% 100% 100% 100%
Penicillin 85.7% 82.3% NR 100% 100% NR
Tetracycline 14.3% 5.9% 5% 0% 0% 2%
TMP/SMX 35.7% 2.9% 1% 0% 0% 1%
Vancomycin 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0%
Inducible Clindamycin Resistance 0% 14.7% NR 3.2% 4.1% NR
  1. Bolded pairs achieved statistical significance (p < 0.05) in chi-square analysis.
  2. MSSA = methicillin-sensitive S. aureus; MRSA = methicillin-resistant S. aureus; TMP/SMX = Trimethoprim/Sulfamethoxazole; NR = Not Reported
  3. aOxacillin resistance defines MRSA vs. MSSA in this clinical laboratory.